Willingness-to-pay for construction noise abatement in Singapore: evidence from a choice modelling survey

PLEASE NOTE: THE VENUE FOR THIS EVENT HAS CHANGED.
PLEASE NOTE: THE TIME FOR THIS EVENT HAS CHANGED.
Crawford School of Public Policy | Arndt-Corden Department of Economics

Event details

PhD Seminar (Econ)

Date & time

Friday 08 February 2019
3.30pm–5.00pm

Venue

Seminar Room 2, Crawford School of Public Policy, 132 Lennox Crossing, ANU

Speaker

Chi Hoong Leong, PhD Scholar

Contacts

Paul Burke, Economics PhD Seminar Convener

Noise from construction activity can adversely affect the mental and physical health of city residents. In order to estimate the non-market benefits of construction noise abatement, a choice modelling survey was conducted in Singapore. Unlike prior studies, which describe changes to noise levels textually, this survey provided participants with recordings of actual construction noise. The study finds that respondents were willing to pay for a reduction in noise levels, a reduction in the duration of construction activity, and an extension of days when construction activity is prohibited. The study also explores the effect of respondent heterogeneity on the willingness-to-pay for construction noise reduction. Respondents who have already implemented private noise abatement measures are more willing to pay for publicly-provided noise abatement. Furthermore, respondents with more sensitive hearing have higher willingness-to-pay. The results can inform benefit-cost assessments of future policies to abate noise.

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